Space Cadets and Starship Troopers: The Voyage Continues

Robert A. Heinlein by William H. Patterson, Jr. By Stacy Hague-Hill, Your Captain for this Journey

In August, Tor will be releasing an all-new biography of a singular figure in the history of the genre: Robert A. Heinlein. This will be the first-ever authorized biography, and it’s a fascinating look at a famously private man.

As our own little celebration of Heinlein and his works, we thought it would be fun to find out just how much of an impact Heinlein’s stories and novels had on a number of our—and your—favorite sf writers. We asked them a simple question—what’s your favorite Heinlein novel?

We’ve been posting their answers once a week as we head toward publication of the biography and so far we’ve heard from David Brin, David Drake, David G. Hartwell, and L.E. Modesitt, Jr. Additionally, we’ve been picked up by Tor.com and Boing Boing, and Cory Doctorow has been posting notes on the biography. In the coming weeks, you’ll see contributions from Michael Swanwick, Charles Stross, and many more.

Thanks to all of you who have jumped in to tell us about your favorites: The Moon is a Harsh Mistress, Starship Troopers, Stranger In a Strange Land, and JOB are just some of the novels discussed in the comments so far. What other Heinlein novels do you all love?

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Robert A. Heinlein: In Dialogue with His Century: Volume 1 (1907-1948): Learning Curve (978-0-7653-1960-9 / $29.99) will be available from Tor Books on August 17th, 2010.

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The journey continues:

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0 thoughts on “Space Cadets and Starship Troopers: The Voyage Continues

  1. I’ve always been partial to ‘Farmer in the Sky.’ I know it was intended to be a YA novel, but I still reread it from time to time.

    ‘Puppet Masters’ and ‘Starship Troopers’ are other favourites, though!

  2. Admittedly, Stranger in a Strange Land is my favorite Heinlein novel, but I’m also inordinately fond of Have Space Suit, Will Travel, Starman Jones, and The Door Into Summer. I’d have to say The Door Into Summer is the best of them, but I read the others first so I’m just as fond of them.

  3. I just re-read “Glory Road” what fun! R.A.H. started me in S.F. with “Rocket Ship Galileo” which lead to “Have Spacesuit Will Travel” and all the other “juvenile” fiction he wrote. I read somewhere when he was asked how he was able to write “kids” books he said “Write the best novel you can and take out the sex” All of his books are my favs, I have loved every word I read.

  4. I am very fond of “The Door Into Summer”, just for the kitty love; but I really love “The Rolling Stones” and “Podkayne of Mars”, for their Martian-based storylines. (Podkayne was one of the first SF books I bought, back when I was about oh, 11.)

  5. While “The Moon Is A Harsh Mistress and “Door Into Summer” are probably my favorites, I always had a predilection for Lazarus Long, so “Methuselah’s Children”, Time Enough For Love” and “To Sail Beyond The Sunset” are among my most read Heinlein books.

  6. _Space Cadet_ and _Citizen of the Galaxy_ are my two favorites. It wasn’t until a few years ago that I realized that this is possibly because there is no romance in either of them, and _Space Cadet_ has no female characters at all (except the planet denizens, of course), so I can avoid Heinlein’s weak point :-> I liked _The Door Into Summer_ when I was younger but now the whole relationship squicks me enormously.

  7. My favorites are “Time Enough For Love”, “The Moon is a Harsh Mistress”, “Number of the Beast”, “Farnham’s Freehold”,….ummm
    all of them, really. He’s the first author I turn to when I need something to read and don’t want or can not afford to pick up a new book.

  8. “Have Space Suit Will Travel” was the first sci-fi novel I read. I had graduated from the kiddie section of the library to the Young Adult section. I was entranced, but my all time favorite was “Stranger in a Strange Land”, read when I was an older teenager. This book opened my mind and blew it away.

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